Would like to have some views if there are any developments or any usage of Twitter in education?

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In my opinion i dont think any social networking should be involved in education and in teaching.
I would think twitter can be used in education to post reminders to students such as when assignments are almost due. Reminders of upcoming quizzes, tests, project deadlines, or maybe if you forgot to mention something in class you can easily let the students know and quickly. You can have students respond to questions you want the students to answer on readings. You can start class discussions amongst the students and take polls. If there is a student that is absent you can get a hold of them and let them know what was covered in class. If the documents are on a pdf then you can easily post it for them to print off at home and turn in when they come back. No child ever has to fall behind for being sick and can always be caught up on assignments and lessons!
I use it for announcements.
There will never be time in the world where every student or school can financially afford things like phones or computers. Therefor using things like twitter or other social sitr will always be leaving someone out. Not to mention the unedited content floating all around the sites, there just isnt any kind of professionlism.

Thank guys for the opinions. :)) do add on if u guys have any more.

Hi, Emy,

Thank you so much for posting this discussion! Twitter, I believe, can serve many functions in the classroom, including spearheading discussions. I know many teachers who have used Twitter for this purpose. In order to do so, create a hashtag (#HIST203) that all students add to the end of their tweets. By doing this, students can perform a Twitter search for that hashtag and have the stream of conversation appear before them. Students can then contribute to the conversation and engage with other students via @ replies and retweets.
For other ideas of how to use Twitter in the classroom, check out this discussion started by Linda Jones: http://bit.ly/e4PO7m

I hope that is helpful for you.

Diana

Have students tweet as a historical character (either real or fictional). Their tweets must be historically accurate in terms of details and language. A couple of good examples include Charles Darwin (@cdarwin) and C.S. Lewis (@cslewis).

I read an article a couple of years ago on how a college professor used it in the classroom with his grad students. He said that it was amazing. Students who wouldn't comment in class would comment on twitter, which he had projected in the front of the classroom while lecturing. Also, he said that seeing their questions and comments really helped direct his lessons and take it in directions he never thought he would go. It empowered the students and encouraged engagement. I think it has a lot of possibilities, as long as the students are prepped thoroughly on internet etiquette and "rules of engagement".

I think it is a great idea. If you can "force" students to collaborate... go for it. When I taught high school I had many students who weren't willing to talk and share in the class because they weren't comfortable sharing their thoughts in an open forum. If you are discussing poetry in class, you could split the class in two or three groups and have each group work on something very specific. Have questions or prompts ready for the groups and make sure that you have permission from their parents, you monitor the responses, and only use twitter during class hours as a group. Never communicate with students from home, late at night.

From experience I can tell you that students that are not very talkative will open up and share with their group.

 

Sincerely,

 

Evaggelos

 

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